at the midpoint

somewhere between actually working and actually resting. this blog is for stuff about ball-jointed dolls and other artwork, with smatterings of science and literature. Also, anthropogenic climate disruption is a real thing.

Back in the beginning, I only planned to have two boy BJDs, one light and one dark. They’ve changed a lot over the years and I’ve bought many more dolls since then, but Kaspar and St. James are still my favorites.

Not really enjoying being “exceptional” right now.

Not really enjoying being “exceptional” right now.

Herodotus Writes a History of the 20th Century

classicsenthusiast:

One of my favorites:

On the Establishment of the World Wide Web, 1990:

In 1990, Tim Berners-Lee constructed a giant net of woven fibers and cast it over the earth, from which the “web” gets its name.

On the San Francisco Earthquake, 1906:

Concerning the great earthquake, I was not able to gain any information from philosophers or scientists, nor could I gain any satisfactory explanation from the inhabitants of the city, who could explain neither why the great city had toppled nor why it had burned.

Some academicians, wishing to seem clever, have attempted to explain the motions of the earth in this place in the following way. They posit that all the earth is comprised of great plates of rock, like the ridges on a turtle’s back, and these float together on a sea of molten earth, and sometimes bump into one another like boats at anchor in the harbor, and that these jolts produce great perturbations of the earth. This is of course is absurd, for if the earth were so composed, then what is the turtle eating?

(Source: classicalcivilisation, via thoughtsnotunveiled)

Satanists Demand Religious Exemption Under Hobby Lobby | Alternet

“The Satanic Temple believes that the body is inviolable ­­ … subject to one’s own will alone.” Further, “we strive to make all decisions regarding personal health based on the best scientific understanding of the world, regardless of the religious or political beliefs of others.”

spaceexp:

Hubble captures star explosion over four years

I know I was just getting all excited about James Webb, but I still love you Hubble!

ucresearch:

themorningnews:


If it all plays out as expected and budgeted, astronomers of the 2020s will be swimming in petabytes of data streaming from space and the ground. Here with a report card on the future of big-time stargazing.

More Eyes on the Skies

The Thirty Meter Telescope



I am not usually happy about construction projects that involve blasting the entire tops off of mountains or building on sacred ground, but I have to admit that I really cannot wait for these telescopes to be operational. Modern astronomy is so mind bending it has actually made me excited for the future, which is not my usual take on the state of the world.

ucresearch:

themorningnews:

If it all plays out as expected and budgeted, astronomers of the 2020s will be swimming in petabytes of data streaming from space and the ground. Here with a report card on the future of big-time stargazing.

More Eyes on the Skies

The Thirty Meter Telescope

I am not usually happy about construction projects that involve blasting the entire tops off of mountains or building on sacred ground, but I have to admit that I really cannot wait for these telescopes to be operational. Modern astronomy is so mind bending it has actually made me excited for the future, which is not my usual take on the state of the world.

ancientart:

Her gods and men call Aphrodite, and Aphrogeneia (the foam-born) because she grew amid the foam.” -Hesiod, Theogony 176.

A few depictions of Aphrodite, the Greek goddess of love and beauty, in ancient Greek pottery.

Aphrodite and Adonis (detail). Attic red-figure squat lekythos, Aison, ca. 410 BC. Courtesy of the Louvre, MNB 2109. Photo by Marie-Lan Nguyen.

Aphrodite on a swan (detail). Tondo from an Attic white-ground red-figured kylix. From tomb F43 in Kameiros (Rhodes). Pistoxenos Painter, circa 460 BC. Courtesy of the British MuseumGR 1869.10-7.77. Photo by Marie-Lan Nguyen.

Vessel with Leda and the Swan (detail). Attributed to the Painter of Louvre MNB 1148, Greek, Apulia, South Italy, about 330 B.C. Courtesy of the Getty Villa, 86.AE.680. Photo by Dave & Margie Hill.